Posted on various pages this week Wednesday March 28th, 2012


Gift from the River Susan Togut, 1st Annual Woodstock Regional 2009

Artists Selected for Far & Wide, The 4th Annual Woodstock Regional Exhibition:

Gertrude Abramson, Loel Barr, David Bender, Jane Bloodgood-Abrams, Peter Bynum, Christine Car, Steve Carver, Ryan Cronin, Robert Cullinane, David Morris Cunningham, Deborah Davidovits, Tracy Deer, Stephen Dickens, Susan English, Jacquelyn Etling, Marcy Freedman, Scott Gillis, Tessa Grundon, Laura Gurton, Lynn Herring, Thomas Huber, Annette Jaret, Matt Kinney, Kirsten Kucer, Allyson Levy, Norm Magnusson, Lowell Miller, Steve Rossi, Susan Sammis, James Westwater, Wendy Ide Williams, Junko Yamada

Congratulations!
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On the Exhibits Page:

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild – Opening at the Kleinert/James gallery this Saturday March 31 4 – 6 pm

MARK 11
Curated by Mark Thomas Kanter.

An exhibition of 31 pre-selected artists from disparate disciplines, presents an intrinsic problem to the curator: how to find coherence amongst widely differing work? In the case of this group exhibition from the artist-participants in the New York Foundation for The Arts’ “MARK 2011-Woodstock” program, a show which includes Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Photography, Video and Installation, it was easy. What ties these distinctive artists together is the remarkably deep involvement each clearly has with their own artistic process, and the high level of discovery each has made through an intrepid exploration of their particular medium. Read more…

The artists in the exhibition are: Jane Bloodgood-Abrams, Jean Campbell, Amy Cheng, Anna Cinquemani, Karen Davis. Jamie Lyn Davis, Tom DeLooza, Thorsten Dennerline, Ginger Ertz, Ray Felix, Michael Forster Rothbart, Yoram Gelman, Shanti Grumbine, Mark Thomas Kanter, Polly Law, Carmen Lizardo, Sarah Anderson Lock, Brian Lynch, Nathan Meltz, Kelly Merchant, Steven Millar, Gilbert Plantinga, Stephen Reynolds, Aide Russell, Anne Seelbach, Barbara Smith, Keiko Sono, Lindsay Stern, Linda Stillman, Suzy Sureck, Alex Young.

Exhibition Dates: March 30 – April 29, 2012, with the Opening Reception on Saturday, March 31, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Location: BYRDCLIFFE Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, 36 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY
Gallery Hours: Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 12:00 – 6:00 pm

Link to Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild web page

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On News page:

INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART

Night Shadows Edward Hopper 1921

Urban Vision: American Works on Paper, 1900–1950
March 30-September 30, 2012

IMA Alliance Gallery

Urban Vision: American Works on Paper, 1900–1950 will explore artistic interpretations of the city. As city dwellers learned to negotiate a rapidly changing environment, the spectacle of metropolitan life became an important focus for artists in the early 20th century. Images of the construction of the massive skyscrapers that came to define New York and Chicago will be paired with scenes of human expression in these urban spaces. The exhibit will bring together 25 etchings, lithographs, and engravings from the IMA’s print collection by such well-known artists as George Bellows, Childe Hassam, Edward Hopper, Reginald Marsh, and Isabel Bishop. Also presented will be the visually compelling work of the lesser-known Gerald Kenneth Geerlings, whose prints have not been on view at the IMA since the 1970s.

Urban Vision: American Works on Paper, 1900–1950 Indianapolis Museum of Art 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis, IN

link to Indianapolis museum
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On random interesting art stuff page:

Look who’s buying art now

Robert Genn Twice-Weekly Letter
Email: rgenn@saraphina.com

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Visiting last night with one of my really wealthy friends and wandering once more among his many art acquisitions, including a few I’d not seen before, I was once more catching the drift of his habits. He insisted on telling me how much he’d paid for this and that. They seemed big prices for big mediocrity from big names. That’s only my opinion–apart from his bad art, he’s got some of mine too, so I didn’t say a word. He also told me he’d flipped a few, “even in this bad market.”

My friend fits the profile of many collectors. They’re in it for the game, the name and the fame. Investment is a factor. As well, many collected works are bequeathed to museums where a tax receipt gives year-end relief to the wealthy donor. For some reason, all of my collector friends who fit this profile are men.

Recent studies are showing a sea change in earning power and discretionary spending. In the USA, among couples where both partners work, 40% of the women now earn more than the men. The stats on university attendance are also telling. Sixty percent of students enrolled in higher education are now women. If present trends continue, in twenty-five years women will outnumber men in medicine and law. Physics, engineering and professorships will not be far behind. In studies of families where the male still maintained a higher income than his spouse, discretionary spending decisions are nearly equal. On the other hand, in families where the wife’s income is higher, it’s the female who makes most of the big decisions. The persistent scenario, frightening to some of the blokes, is that CEO mom goes shopping after work while dad is home feeding crackers to the kids and watching Barney.

And what particular art are these rich gals buying? In my observation, they’re not so much interested in the game, name or fame. In the last few years I’ve not heard one single active female art buyer utter the word “investment.” They’re more interested in connection, shared experience, life enhancement, tailored quality, nest-and-nurture, soul-polishing, and yes, décor and colour-coordination. Funnily, while women do more measuring than men, big size is not so important. I would be really interested in what gallery owners have to say about this, but women seem often to be making art decisions based on lofty ideals, genuine emotions and high sensibilities. Is it that women have better values than men? More imagination? Better taste? More sense? Or is it just less testosterone?

Best regards,

Robert

PS: “Women are asking what privileges their own breadwinning buys.” (Liza Mundy)

Esoterica: In what I call FABE (the Female Art Buying Explosion), women have less hesitancy in collecting women artists. This may be partly because female-run and female-owned galleries have risen dramatically. In the years I’ve been painting, the percentage of female artists in galleries has slowly crept up. A few galleries now represent more women than men. Considering female artists outnumber male artists 80/20, there is still a way to go.

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On Press page:

Art Murphy


“Art Murphy Unearths Ageless Beauty in His Photography” is a feature article in the Spring issue of Kaatskill Life Magazine. Art, a WAAM member, was interviewed for the story by Robert Titus (aka “The Catskills Geologist”). An eight page spread of Art’s fossil images accompany the interview. Kaatskill Life can be found on newsstands and in bookstores throughout the area.



Categories: Exhibits, News, Press, Random interesting art stuff, Uncategorized

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