Smithsonian American Art Museum presents major retrospective of early American Modernist Yasuo Kuniyoshi

Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Maine Family,

Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Maine Family,

“The Artistic Journey of Yasuo Kuniyoshi” is the first comprehensive overview of the artist’s work by a U.S. museum in more than 65 years. The exhibition is a selective survey that will trace Kuniyoshi’s career though 66 of his finest paintings and drawings chosen from leading public and private collections in America and Japan. Most of the works from Japanese collections have not been exhibited in the U.S. for more than 25 years.

“The Artistic Journey of Yasuo Kuniyoshi” is co-curated by Joann Moser, deputy chief curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Tom Wolf, a Kuniyoshi scholar and professor of art history at Bard College. The exhibition will be on view from April 3 through Aug. 30; the Smithsonian American Art Museum is the only venue. A catalog written by Wolf will accompany the exhibition.

“Kuniyoshi remains one of our country’s most important and innovative modern artists, yet his work has not been widely exhibited for decades,” said Betsy Broun, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “We are proud that the Smithsonian American Art Museum will enable a new generation of viewers to encounter Kuniyoshi and his powerful, enriching paintings.”

Full article here courtesy ArtDaily.org

From Wikipedia:

Kuniyoshi was born in Okayama, Japan in 1893.[1] He migrated to America in 1906, choosing not to attend military school in Japan.[3] Kuniyoshi originally intended to study English and return to Japan to work as a translator. He spent some time in Seattle, before enrolling at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design.[4] Kuniyoshi spent three years in Los Angeles, discovering his love for the arts. He then moved to New York City to pursue an art career. Kuniyoshi studied briefly at the National Academy and at the Independent School in New York City, and then studied underKenneth Hayes Miller at the Art Students League of New York.[4] He later taught at the Art Students League of New York in New York City and in Woodstock, New York. Nan Lurie was among his students.[5] Around 1930, the artist built a home and studio on Ohayo Mountain Road in Woodstock. He was an active member of the artistic community there for the rest of his life. [6]

Link to wikipedia Kuniyoshi article

Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Boy Stealing Fruit

Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Boy Stealing Fruit

 

 

 



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